Users' questions

Who said use it up wear it out do or do without?

Who said use it up wear it out do or do without?

Boyd K. Packer
Quote by Boyd K. Packer: “Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without.”

What is the use it up wear it out?

During the Great Depression money was hard to come by and so people were not able to go to the store or order whatever they wanted or needed online. In fact there was no online in those days! People became creative in the way they used, and reused, what they had.

What is the meaning of the saying eat it up wear it out make it do or go without?

“Use it up… Wear it out… Make it do… Or do without” – what a great slogan! It was coined by the War Advertising Council during World War II to promote the dual need to conserve scarce resources and to help keep prices down by not generating excess demand.

Where did the saying ” use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without ” originate?

“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without” was a conservation motto during World War II, popularized in 1942-43. The saying was frequently credited to New England. “Eat it up, wear it out, make it do” (not “use it up”) appears to have been the earlier form of the saying and has been cited in print since at least 1933.

When to use it up, wear it out?

So, if you’re looking to “Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without” then here are some ideas and tips to get you started: If you have it, use it – Whenever possible, use up what you already have before buying something new. It might not be as shiny or fancy, but it’s certainly going to be functional.

When to use it up, make it do or do without?

There’s nothing quite like the feeling of pride you get when you reuse something or make it yourself. So, if you’re looking to “Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without” then here are some ideas and tips to get you started: If you have it, use it – Whenever possible, use up what you already have before buying something new.

What does the adage eat it up, wear it out or go without mean?

R. E. S. wishes the exact wording of an old English adage on thrift to the effect that one matches a thing up, turns it over and makes it do until something better canb be afforded: It reads: “Eat it up, wear it out, make it do, or go without.”